Author Archive


Horror Queers Sets the Record Straight

by on Feb.12, 2019, under Syndicated from the Web

Reposted from Wicked October | Go to Original Post

The latest podcast from Bloody-Disgusting.com gives a voice to a disenfranchised segment of the horror community: Horror Queers. The Horror Queers podcast based on the column of the same name, looks at one horror movie at a time through a gay lens to suss out the actual, implied, subtly hinted, or unintentional queer moments, and review them in a modern context. Deeps dives into older films (so far from 90s onwards) are discussed for cultural relevancy, enduring appeal, and the people making the films. As a result previously panned movies like Jennifer’s Body or Hostel get fresh-eyed assessments.

Arguably, podcasts are most successful when hosts have engaging on-air personalities. I’ve been (re)watching the selected movies to see the world through the eyes of hosts Joe Lipsett and Trace Thurman. Thurman comes across as that lively and enthusiastic friend that you love to go to the movies with because he will appreciate that one great moment in a terrible film. Lipsett by contrast comes across as more reserved and obligingly snarky, like a certain Dowager Countess of Grantham. He is soft spoken, razor sharp, and reminds me of a friend who never seems quite pleased with anything. Together the dynamic is electric: a Siskel to an Ebert that often see eye-to-eye but love to disagree with cheeky aplomb.

The podcast itself is fun, informative, and lively. Sure a touch long but in fairness, I think most podcasts run too long. I could turn it off, but what if I miss a salient point about Jesse Bradford’s himbo in Swimfan? The commentary often makes me question my initial opinions on films which is the mark of effective critique. For example, Hostel has one clearly queer scene but is the relationship of the two main characters really more than it appears? Film media, even horror, is a kind of art. One person’s perception is just as valid as another who might see something entirely different. The Horror Queers do their homework and present thoughtful arguments to support their opinions. In the case of Hostel, I wonder if poor editing amplified lingering gazes/touches that could be considered queer. After all, performances are “made” in the editing room.

None of my friends truly love horror movies like I do. Beyond the gore and terror, it’s likely because the horror genre often veers towards misogyny and homophobia (among many other phobias). Horror Queers fills a specific void in the landscape that will hopefully bring together the LGBTQ+ community and allies who love horror, and have those awkward and frank discussions about our beloved genre. I’m very excited to see how this podcast develops, and grateful for a major site like Bloody Disgusting to support such an outing.

Listen to the Horror Queers podcast.

Read the Horror Queers articles.

Sign up to sponsor to the Horror Queers on Patreon.

Leave a Comment more...

Horror Queers Sets the Record Straight

by on Feb.12, 2019, under Syndicated from the Web

Reposted from Wicked October | Go to Original Post

The latest podcast from Bloody-Disgusting.com gives a voice to a disenfranchised segment of the horror community: Horror Queers. The Horror Queers podcast based on the column of the same name, looks at one horror movie at a time through a gay lens to suss out the actual, implied, subtly hinted, or unintentional queer moments, and review them in a modern context. Deeps dives into older films (so far from 90s onwards) are discussed for cultural relevancy, enduring appeal, and the people making the films. As a result previously panned movies like Jennifer’s Body or Hostel get fresh-eyed assessments.

Arguably, podcasts are most successful when hosts have engaging on-air personalities. I’ve been (re)watching the selected movies to see the world through the eyes of hosts Joe Lipsett and Trace Thurman. Thurman comes across as that lively and enthusiastic friend that you love to go to the movies with because he will appreciate that one great moment in a terrible film. Lipsett by contrast comes across as more reserved and obligingly snarky, like a certain Dowager Countess of Grantham. He is soft spoken, razor sharp, and reminds me of a friend who never seems quite pleased with anything. Together the dynamic is electric: a Siskel to an Ebert that often see eye-to-eye but love to disagree with cheeky aplomb.

The podcast itself is fun, informative, and lively. Sure a touch long but in fairness, I think most podcasts run too long. I could turn it off, but what if I miss a salient point about Jesse Bradford’s himbo in Swimfan? The commentary often makes me question my initial opinions on films which is the mark of effective critique. For example, Hostel has one clearly queer scene but is the relationship of the two main characters really more than it appears? Film media, even horror, is a kind of art. One person’s perception is just as valid as another who might see something entirely different. The Horror Queers do their homework and present thoughtful arguments to support their opinions. In the case of Hostel, I wonder if poor editing amplified lingering gazes/touches that could be considered queer. After all, performances are “made” in the editing room.

None of my friends truly love horror movies like I do. Beyond the gore and terror, it’s likely because the horror genre often veers towards misogyny and homophobia (among many other phobias). Horror Queers fills a specific void in the landscape that will hopefully bring together the LGBTQ+ community and allies who love horror, and have those awkward and frank discussions about our beloved genre. I’m very excited to see how this podcast develops, and grateful for a major site like Bloody Disgusting to support such an outing.

Listen to the Horror Queers podcast.

Read the Horror Queers articles.

Sign up to sponsor to the Horror Queers on Patreon.

Leave a Comment more...





Quick Takes: Prodigy, Golem, Velvet Buzzsaw, Tumbbad

by on Feb.09, 2019, under Syndicated from the Web

Reposted from Wicked October | Go to Original Post


The Prodigy has some clever ideas and soot-dark moments but the mounting dread is muted by a lethargic pace, repetitive narrative & bland characters. Jackson Robert Scott as the evil kid is chilling and anchors the movie but it’s not scary or radical enough to stand apart. (In theaters on Feb. 8)

I’m a sucker for period pieces and The Golem smartly updates the figure of Jewish folklore with a well-crafted, sincere & culturally relevant film. There’s surprising emotional resonance even while bodies are being torn apart. That’s quite a feat Dread Presents! (Available on VOD)

You may hate art after Velvet Buzzsaw. Jake is hilarious in this odd Final Destination meets Absolutely Fabulous-ish queer horror satire comedy that never tips too pointedly in any one direction. Check your expectations and it’ll be a merry momentary diversion. (Stream from Netflix)

Folklore, fantasy and horror collide into a feast for the eyes in the creepy and atmospheric Tumbbad. It’s thin on characters and bows a bit in the middle but the epic scale and wildly effective visual effects tell the story without the need for words. This is a very good film. (Stream from Amazon Prime Video)

Leave a Comment more...

Quick Takes: Prodigy, Golem, Velvet Buzzsaw, Tumbbad

by on Feb.09, 2019, under Syndicated from the Web

Reposted from Wicked October | Go to Original Post


The Prodigy has some clever ideas and soot-dark moments but the mounting dread is muted by a lethargic pace, repetitive narrative & bland characters. Jackson Robert Scott as the evil kid is chilling and anchors the movie but it’s not scary or radical enough to stand apart. (In theaters on Feb. 8)

I’m a sucker for period pieces and The Golem smartly updates the figure of Jewish folklore with a well-crafted, sincere & culturally relevant film. There’s surprising emotional resonance even while bodies are being torn apart. That’s quite a feat Dread Presents! (Available on VOD)

You may hate art after Velvet Buzzsaw. Jake is hilarious in this odd Final Destination meets Absolutely Fabulous-ish queer horror satire comedy that never tips too pointedly in any one direction. Check your expectations and it’ll be a merry momentary diversion. (Stream from Netflix)

Folklore, fantasy and horror collide into a feast for the eyes in the creepy and atmospheric Tumbbad. It’s thin on characters and bows a bit in the middle but the epic scale and wildly effective visual effects tell the story without the need for words. This is a very good film. (Stream from Amazon Prime Video)

Leave a Comment more...

Quick Takes: Prodigy, Golem, Velvet Buzzsaw, Tumbbad

by on Feb.09, 2019, under Syndicated from the Web

Reposted from Wicked October | Go to Original Post

The Prodigy has some clever ideas and soot-dark moments but the mounting dread is muted by a lethargic pace, repetitive narrative & bland characters. Jackson Robert Scott as the evil kid is chilling and anchors the movie but it’s not scary or radical enough to stand apart. (In theaters on Feb. 8)

I’m a sucker for period pieces and The Golem smartly updates the figure of Jewish folklore

Leave a Comment more...

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